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Journey to understanding SA’s departed heroes

first_imgAlbertina Sisulu, South Africa’s mother of the nation, is buried beside her beloved husband Walter in the Newclare cemetery in Johannesburg. Photo: City of Joburg By Romaana Naidoo19 May 2014I might not have been born into a democratic South Africa but my parents sure did their best to shelter me from being ostracised solely based on my skin colour. Although this was probably instinctive on their part as parents innately try to protect their kids, I think it prevented me from being fully aware about issues surrounding the nation’s fight for a free and fair country.Forging forward many years later and South Africa is celebrating 20 years of democracy. For me, a great way to understand the anti-apartheid struggle has been to find out about the lives of the country’s departed heroes, those who fought tirelessly for freedom, regardless of the sacrifices.To walk into any one of Johannesburg’s cemeteries is to explore the country’s rich history through the stalwarts that lie resting there. Take, for instance,  Avalon Cemetery, the final resting place of many prominent individuals who were involved in the liberation struggle – among them Hector Pieterson and Tsietsi Mashinini, victims of the 1976 uprising.It sends chills down my spine just thinking about the passion and selflessness of students and the driving force they embodied in a bid to abolish something as inhuman as apartheid, fighting til the death to see it eradicated.As part of my job as a writer for Johannesburg City Parks, I have been researching South Africa’s fallen heroes – and I’m humbled by the sacrifices made by them and their young families to see a country unburdened from racial hate and intolerable cruelty. Johannesburg holds the the stories of many heroes and heroines, many of whom have been laid to rest in the 35 cemeteries throughout the city.Political activist Nontsikelelo Albertina Sisulu (aka the “Mother of the Nation”) is just such an example. She was laid to rest beside her husband, Walter Sisulu, at the Newclare Cemetery. The couple fought tirelessly and spent years in prison or deep underground to help the people of South Africa. He joined the African National Congress (ANC) in 1940, and along with Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo was part of the ANC Youth League.Read more about South Africa’s history and heritage on SouthAfrica.infolast_img read more

10 months agoDaniel Amartey delighted with new Leicester deal

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Daniel Amartey delighted with new Leicester dealby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveDaniel Amartey has signed a new deal with Leicester City.The Ghanaian, 23, has agreed terms on a three-and-a-half-year contract as he continues his recovery from an ankle condition sustained in October’s 1-1 draw with West Ham United.“I am very happy to sign this contract at Leicester City,” he told LCFC TV, speaking at the Club’s Belvoir Drive training ground this week.“I’m an easy guy, I work hard, I focus and by God’s grace, my recovery is getting better. I was playing well and then I got this injury, but I have to be strong when I come back.“Personally, I am happy because last season I didn’t get much playing time and this season the manager gave me the chance so, for me, I was very happy.” last_img read more

Video: Lee Corso Finally Picks Michigan State On College GameDay

first_imgThree times this year, ESPN College GameDay analyst Lee Corso had the opportunity to pick Michigan State. Three times he opted not to, and consequently, lost. It appears that he’s finally a believer.Saturday, Corso, in Indianapolis ahead of the Big Ten title game between the Spartans and the Iowa Hawkeyes, picked MSU to win the conference. He donned a large Spartans helmet to make his pick. Here’s video, via FanSided’s Mike Dyce.Corso picks Michigan State pic.twitter.com/F7YIQ1I5Yl— Mike Dyce (@mikedyce) December 5, 2015Lee Corso is 0-3 picking against @MSU_Football in @ChevyTrucks #SaturdaySelections this year. He learned his lesson! pic.twitter.com/Ga5f0ftKmx— ESPN (@espn) December 5, 2015Corso’s blessing isn’t exactly a good thing – he’s just 3-10 on the year. That being said, Michigan State fans are still probably feeling pretty good about his decision.last_img read more

Video: Roy Williams Tees Off On ESPN

first_imgRoy Williams tees off on ESPN.roy williams tees off on espn green roomNorth Carolina head coach Roy Williams is upset with ESPN – and he had no problem letting everyone know on Friday. Williams, ahead of his team’s contest against Boston College this Saturday, expressed that he isn’t a fan of how the network seems to focus on the “green room” players during broadcasts – meaning the players who are locks to be first round NBA Draft picks. He thinks that the game of college basketball is great – and ESPN shouldn’t just be giving the next-level players attention.Here’s video, via North Carolina:Williams makes some good points, but it’s not as-if he hasn’t seen his own share of “green room” players come through his program. Regardless, we don’t expect the network to change its ways.last_img read more

Freeland touts made in Canada NAFTA approach meet with advisory panel

first_imgOTTAWA – The Canadian automotive industry is anxiously waiting to see if the next round of NAFTA negotiations will provide some clarity on American demands that vehicles must have “substantial” U.S. content to qualify for duty-free movement within North America.Rules of origin — one of the most complicated and contentious issues on the table, particularly when it comes to the auto sector — is on the agenda for the third round which starts Saturday in Ottawa.David MacNaughton, Canada’s ambassador to the U.S., acknowledged Friday that the clock is ticking on the talks overall — and that negotiators won’t be able to take a passive approach if they want the best deal possible.“We do have an opportunity to be a real powerhouse in the world, and keep our citizens prosperous and happy, and we can’t do that simply by playing defence,” MacNaughton said following an event in Banff, Alta.“We’ve got to really iron out some of the difficulties that have emerged, or some of the things that weren’t thought of in 1994, but also look forward 10 years and say, ‘Where we want to be there?’“The one thing that I can absolutely assure you of: I am 100 per cent confident, in terms of these discussions, that there will be some drama before they’re over.”But while Canadian officials had been hopeful the U.S. would finally put some flesh on the bones of its auto-sector position over the course of the five-day session, they say it’s now uncertain whether American negotiators are ready to show their hand.Flavio Volpe, president of the Automobile Parts Manufacturers Association, said everyone in government and industry is ready to spring into action the moment the U.S. tables its position but, in the meantime, they’re all “circling the airport.” He suspects they’ll have to continue circling for some weeks yet.As far as Canadian officials are concerned, automobiles — specifically, the exodus of auto industry jobs and investment to low-wage Mexico — are at the root of President Donald Trump’s threat to rip up the North American Free Trade Agreement. And resolving the problem will be the key to the success, or failure, of efforts to rewrite the trilateral trade pact.Hence, the eagerness to find out precisely what is the American bottom line on rules of origin.“We’re waiting with bated breath, I guess, like our Canadian negotiating team and probably the Mexican negotiating team, as to what the U.S. is actually going to propose,” says Mark Nantais, president of the Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association.U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer opened the first round of negotiations in Washington last month with the aggressive pronouncement that “rules of origin, particularly on autos and auto parts, must require higher NAFTA content and substantial U.S. content.” Moreover, he said there must be a way to verify that content.The U.S. has not gone into any further detail since then. But it’s bound to be controversial when they do.“Trade negotiations are based on the concept of a balance of concessions and the United States explicitly wants an imbalanced result (that favours the U.S.),” says Ted Alden, senior fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington.“That’s going to be a pretty hard thing for Canada and Mexico to swallow and I’ve never seen a trade negotiation conducted where that was the starting point.”Under the current terms of NAFTA, at least 62.5 per cent of a vehicle’s content must be made in North America to qualify for duty-free access between the U.S., Canada and Mexico — which is already “the highest content requirement of any trade deal we’re aware of,” according to Nantais.Reports in the U.S. suggest the Trump administration wants to raise that to more than 70 per cent and add a requirement that anywhere between 35 and 50 per cent must be made specifically in the United States.Moreover, the U.S. reportedly wants to add steel and electronics, which aren’t currently included, to the list of components whose country of origin must be traced.Automakers on both sides of the border contend the U.S. position would disrupt their fully integrated North American supply chain, add costly red tape and ultimately weaken the North American industry’s competitiveness.And trade experts on both sides of the border are warning that it could backfire.In a paper published Thursday, Scotiabank Economics argues that there is no need to tighten rules of origin for the auto sector; more than 75 per cent of vehicle parts are already made in North America.That could drop, the paper acknowledges, with the rapidly increasing computerization of cars and trucks since the electronic components are primarily produced in China, Japan and Germany. But tightening the NAFTA content requirement wouldn’t necessarily result in those components being made in the U.S.More likely, Scotiabank says automakers would move more production to Mexico or even opt to conduct trade outside NAFTA altogether, preferring to pay the 2.5 per cent tariff on auto imports to the U.S.Dionisio Perez Jacome, Mexico’s ambassador to Canada, warned Friday of precisely such a scenario if the requirement for U.S. content is increased.“We have to look at it very carefully, in order not to have it backfire,” he said.“Certain companies, if we increase it too much, might just opt to import cars directly and pay the 2.5 per cent tariff and we would lose that production. So that is an element that needs to be discussed.”Unifor president Jerry Dias, whose union represents Canadian autoworkers, supports hiking the North American content requirement, but warns it can’t be done in isolation.“Unless you fix the rest of the mess, it’s meaningless,” says Dias, who “absolutely” expects to see more detail on the American position during the next few days.The rest of the mess includes, in his view, more stringent labour standards that would significantly hike wages for Mexican auto and auto parts workers and an increase in the low U.S. and Canadian tariffs on imported vehicles outside of NAFTA.Without those two additional measures, he says more jobs and investment will simply wind up flowing to Mexico or outside North America altogether.— With files from Armina Ligaya in Toronto and Ian Bickis in Banff, Alta.last_img read more

Cronos Group first Canadian pot company to begin trading on Nasdaq

first_imgTORONTO – Cronos Group Inc. is set to become the first Canadian cannabis company to have shares listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market.The Toronto-based firm says it expects common shares will begin trading Tuesday on the Nasdaq under the ticker symbol “CRON.”Cronos will also retain its listing on the TSX Venture Exchange under the symbol “MJN.”CEO Mike Gorenstein says the company’s listing on Nasdaq reflects the “significant progress” Cronos has made in strengthening its corporate governance and expanding its global footprint.Cronos operates Peace Naturals Project Inc. in Ontario and Original BC Ltd. in British Columbia.The company also has multiple international production and distribution platforms in Israel and Australia, and access to 12,000 German pharmacies.last_img

Health care energy companies power US stock market higher

first_imgWall Street capped a day of volatile trading with a late-afternoon buying spree that sent U.S. stock indexes to a mostly higher finish Friday.Despite the 11th-hour rally, the benchmark S&P 500 index ended with its second weekly loss in four weeks.Gains in health care and energy companies powered the market higher.The market got a brief boost after President Donald Trump expressed optimism that the U.S. and China will reach a deal to resolve their costly trade dispute. The remarks came as representatives of both countries have resumed talks.Large retailers and media and communications companies were the laggards.“The market and market participants are more unsettled now than they have been in years,” said Tom Martin, senior portfolio manager with Globalt Investments. “We’re that much further on in the cycle and you have these tariffs and trade wars that are really still in the very early stages.”The S&P 500 index rose 6.07 points, or 0.2 per cent, to 2,736.27. The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 123.95 points, or 0.5 per cent, to 25,413.22. The Nasdaq composite slid 11.16 points, or 0.2 per cent, to 7,247.87. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies picked up 3.41 points, or 0.2 per cent, to $1,527.53.The S&P 500, which finished higher for the second straight day, ended the week with a loss of 1.6 per cent.Like much of this week, the market spent much of Friday veering between bouts of listless trading and modest swings.“Investors are really trying to figure out how they want to be positioned based on the incoming information,” Martin said. “It’s not surprising to me that at this time of year, given what we’ve seen, that we’re getting the intraday moves we’re getting.”One of the day’s market swings came as traders reacted to Trump’s remarks on trade.At the White House, speaking about the lingering trade dispute, the president said he hoped the U.S. could make a deal with China.“I think a deal will be made,” Trump said. “We’ll find out very soon.”Stocks snapped higher after the remarks were reported, with the Dow briefly jumping as much as 220 points, before pulling back to about where they were beforehand.Soybean futures spiked after Trump’s comments. Soybean prices have fallen sharply since this Spring as the trade dispute with China led to a steep drop in China’s purchases of U.S. soybeans. Soybean futures jumped from $8.83 to $8.92 a bushel following the comments. They had traded as high as $10.78 a bushel in early March.The Trump administration has imposed a 10 per cent tariff on $200 billion of Chinese goods over complaints Beijing steals or pressures foreign companies to hand over technology as the price of market access. That tariff is set to rise to 25 per cent in January. Another $50 billion of Chinese goods already is subject to 25 per cent duties. Beijing has responded with penalty duties on $110 billion of American goods.Washington and Beijing resumed talks over their spiraling trade dispute this week ahead of a meeting between President Xi Jinping and Trump, China’s Commerce Ministry said Thursday.Health care stocks were among the biggest gainers Friday. Universal Health Services gained 3.9 per cent to $133.Troubled California power provider PG&E surged 37.5 per cent to $24.40 after the president of the utility’s state regulator said it was essential for a power company to have the financial strength to operate safely. The remark late Thursday by California Public Utilities Commission President Michael Picker appeared to reassure investors concerned the company may face a torrent of costs related to the devastating wildfire in Northern California. There’s been speculation that PG&E’s equipment may have set off the blaze, which started Nov. 8 and has killed at least 56 people.Chipmaker Nvidia led a sell-off in technology stocks. The company plunged 18.8 per cent to $164.43 after saying it had a large number of unsold chips because of a big drop in mining of cryptocurrencies.Retailers also weighed on the market. Nordstrom cratered 13.7 per cent to $50.93 after the department store issued weak guidance for the full year. That disappointing outlook overshadowed the company’s third-quarter results, which topped Wall Street’s estimates.Williams-Sonoma tumbled 11.2 per cent to $53.76 after the cookware seller said products were delayed because of shipping congestion out of China ahead of U.S. tariffs.The price of U.S. crude oil finished flat after a two-day winning streak. Benchmark U.S. crude oil was unchanged at $56.46 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gained 0.2 per cent to $66.76 a barrel in London. Despite the latest uptick, U.S. crude oil is still down about 13 per cent for the month.The pickup in oil prices helped lift energy stocks. Helmerich & Payne rose 4.2 per cent to $62.59.In other energy trading, heating oil held steady to $2.07 a gallon and wholesale gasoline jumped 1.3 per cent to $1.58 a gallon.Natural gas, which spiked earlier this week amid forecasts calling for a cold snap across much of the Northeast and South, continued to climb Friday, adding 5.8 per cent to $4.27 per 1,000 cubic feet. It is now up around 32 per cent this month.Bond prices rose. The 10-year Treasury fell to 3.07 per cent from 3.11 per cent late Thursday.The dollar fell to 112.83 yen from 113.58 yen on Thursday. The euro strengthened to $1.1412 from $1.1348. The pound rose to $1.2831 from $1.2791.The price of gold rose 0.7 per cent to $1,223 an ounce. Silver gained 0.8 per cent to $14.38 an ounce. Copper climbed 1.9 per cent to $2.80 a pound.Major European stock indexes closed lower as trade tensions and political risks surrounding Britain’s exit from the European Union kept investors cautious. Germany’s DAX lost 0.1 per cent and France’s CAC slid 0.2 per cent. Britain’s FTSE 100 gave up 0.3 per cent.In Asia, Japan’s Nikkei 225 index lost 0.6 per cent while the Hang Seng in Hong Kong added 0.3 per cent. South Korea’s Kospi rose 0.2 per cent.Alex Veiga, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Torstar cuts 13 jobs at StarMetro in Toronto no papers will be

first_imgTORONTO — The company that runs Canada’s largest newspaper by circulation is laying off more than a dozen employees who work on its free commuter papers.Torstar, which operates the Toronto Star and owns a share of The Canadian Press, is cutting 13 jobs in its StarMetro department.The company says those affected are mostly involved in editing and production, and are all based in Toronto.It says the work will be moved to its Star editorial department, its copy editing centre in Hamilton and its pagination centre in northern Toronto.None of the company’s publications, which include StarMetro papers in Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary and Halifax, will be cancelled.Torstar launched the StarMetro brand in April, adding 20 jobs in what it called a “major national expansion.” Companies in this story: (TS.B)The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Indigenous protesters in Washington declare Trans Mountain wont be built

first_imgThe Trans Mountain expansion – recently bought by Canada for $4.5 billion – doesn’t only affect Canadian waters or land. The project will increase tanker traffic seven-fold in the Salish Sea, which borders British Columbia and Washington, and Kinder Morgan has noted the expansion potential of a connected 111-kilometre pipeline that runs from B.C.’s Fraser Valley to Washington refineries.Many Indigenous activists trace their roots to both sides of the border. George-Parker’s father is from North Vancouver’s Tsleil-Waututh Nation and his mother is from Washington’s Tulalip Tribes. He travels to B.C. often and in April disrupted a speech by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Vancouver.“Our people never had borders,” he said. “We still try not to let borders separate us.”The 2014 shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School deeply affected George-Parker, now 21. He found it outrageous that governments subsidize big business while underfunding education and counselling for young people. Canada’s purchase of Trans Mountain is the latest example of wasted government money, he said.Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has criticized Trudeau’s government for buying the pipeline project, calling it a “major step backward” in the climate change fight.Even though Inslee opposes the expansion, some protesters in his state don’t feel supported. Police arrested Janene Hampton in January and charged her with criminal trespassing after she and several other Indigenous women camped on the state capitol lawn to protest resource projects including Trans Mountain. VANCOUVER, B.C. – Cedar George-Parker remembers the moment he decided to devote his life to defending Indigenous people and their traditional territories. It was the one-year anniversary of a shooting at his high school that killed four of his classmates in Marysville, Wash.“I dropped to my knees and I said, ‘I’m going to make a change in the world,’” he recalled.George-Parker is among the Indigenous protesters in Washington state promising to fight the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. Activists call the project the Standing Rock of the north, comparing it to the fierce Standing Rock Sioux protests that stalled the Dakota Access Pipeline for months. Hampton also camped at the Standing Rock protest for months. She joined the movement against pipelines to protect the water, said Hampton, a member of the Colville Okanagan Tribe, which has traditional territories spanning B.C.’s southern Interior to northeast Washington.“One of the big fights for us as Aboriginal people is the whales,” she said, adding they use sonar, and existing vessel noise has already disrupted their communication.Canada’s $1.5-billion oceans protection plan includes $7.2 million to increase the use of technologies that monitor underwater noise. It has also announced other steps to support the recovery of the endangered southern resident killer whale population, which lives in B.C. and Washington waters.The Canadian government often touts its oceans protection plan as “world-leading,” but as recently as May 2017, officials in Washington raised questions about Canada’s preparedness for an oil spill.center_img Washington required Kinder Morgan to conduct a worst-case scenario exercise. The company simulated a spill of 3,024 barrels of heavy synthetic crude oil in the Sumas River, which runs from B.C.’s Fraser Valley to Whatcom County, Wash.In a report following the exercise, state ecology department staff wrote that Kinder Morgan brought together a skilled spill management team including staff from U.S., Canadian, B.C. and Washington government agencies. But the report also said non-floating oil tactics planned on the Washington side were not planned on the B.C. side, and Canada did not discuss the type of equipment it would use to clean up a major spill.The exercise was conducted to meet U.S. regulatory requirements and was not focused on the Canadian response, said James Stevenson, a spokesman for the National Energy Board. A joint U.S.-Canadian plan to respond to cross-border spills exists but was not activated during the May 2017 exercise, he said.Canada’s purchase of the project includes the Puget Sound pipeline, a 111-kilometre line that diverts from the existing Trans Mountain pipeline in B.C. and carries oil to four Washington refineries. Environmental groups now fear an expansion to the Puget Sound line, citing 2017 financial disclosure documents in which Kinder Morgan touted the potential for increasing capacity.“That is definitely a big concern,” said Rebecca Ponzio, campaign director for Stand Up to Oil, a coalition of U.S. groups that oppose new oil terminals and coastal exports.Canada’s Department of Finance did not directly answer a question about whether it would consider expanding the Washington line, but it said it planned to follow Kinder Morgan’s 2018 construction schedule for the expansion of the pipeline in B.C. and Alberta.Trans Mountain, a subsidiary of Kinder Morgan, said market conditions dictate how much crude oil is transported through the Puget Sound pipeline. While the line could be expanded, the company expects the majority of the expansion capacity from the Trans Mountain project will be for export from a marine terminal in Burnaby, B.C.But protesters won’t allow construction on the expansion to proceed without a fight.“That pipeline will never go through,” said Paul Wagner, a member of the Saanich First Nation who lives in Redmond, Wash., and goes by the traditional name Cheoketen.“The people are rising up.”By Laura KaneTHE CANADIAN PRESSlast_img read more

IRDAI seeks proposal from LIC on IDBI Bank stake reduction

first_imgNew Delhi: Insurance regulator IRDAI Monday said it has sought proposal from Life Insurance Corporation of India (LIC) for paring its shareholding in the recently acquired controlling stake in IDBI Bank. Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDAI) stipulates that insurers are allowed to hold only up to 15 per cent stake in any listed entity. But LIC, with a special dispensation from IRDAI, holds more than the limit in some state-run banks. Also Read – Maruti cuts production for 8th straight month in SepBesides, the Reserve Bank permits a ceiling of 15 per cent for promoter stake in a private sector bank. “We will decide on the timeline (for stake reduction by LIC in IDBI Bank). We are not leaving it to them. I have asked them (LIC) to give a proposal and after that we will take a decision,” IRDAI Chairman Subhash Chandra Khuntia said on the sidelines of an event organised by Ficci here. Last June, IRDAI permitted LIC to acquire up to 51 per cent stake in debt-ridden IDBI Bank. On December 28, LIC pumped Rs 14,500 crore into the bank as part of its takeover, following which it injected another Rs 5,030 crore on January 21. Also Read – Ensure strict implementation on ban of import of e-cigarettes: revenue to CustomsAs a result, LIC acquired 51 per cent controlling stake in the bank, making the insurer the lender’s majority shareholder. For the third quarter ended December 2018, IDBI Bank reported widening of loss by nearly threefold to Rs 4,185.48 crore. The bank had reported a loss of Rs 1,524.31 crore in the year-ago period. Total income fell to Rs 6,190.94 crore for the quarter, compared with Rs 7,125.20 crore in the corresponding period a year ago. With regard to exposure of the insurance firm to debt- ridden IL&FS group companies, Khuntia said, the regulator will ensure that policyholders do not lose money. “Either they get it back fully or they will have to provide for it. Some of the IL&FS companies may be better off. We will find some ways so that policyholders are protected,” he said. Speaking at the event, Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (AB-PMJAY) and National Health Authority CEO Indu Bhushan said Ayushman Bharat (AB) has benefited 15 lakh people since its launch in September. In 170 days, about Rs 2,000 crore has been spent on providing free health treatment to beneficiaries, he said.last_img read more