Month: August 2021

South Africa to consider tougher gambling laws

first_img Email Address Tags: Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Regions: Africa Southern Africa South Africa South Africa to consider tougher gambling laws South Africa’s Minister of Trade and Industry, Rob Davies, has tabled a new bill that sets out harsher rules and regulations for gambling in the country. The 49-page Amendment Bill features mooted changes to how gambling is both structured and regulated in South Africa. Measures set out include the National Gambling Board being repositioned as the country’s gambling regulator. The bill also includes plans for a National Lotteries Commission to assume the regulation of all wagers on the national lottery, foreign lottery, lottery results and sports pools. South Africa is also keen to clamp down on illegal gambling with all unlawful winnings to be forfeited to the National Gambling Regulator. Elsewhere, should the bill pass, dog racing and all bets on the sport would be prohibited in South Africa, while a self-regulating body would be recognised in the horse racing industry. Casinos, limited pay-out machines and bingo would face tougher regulations, with plans to limit both the number of bingo licences and machines, as well as to regulate electronic bingo. New restrictions could also be placed on gambling premises and the location of automated tellers, with plans to introduce ‘separate’ and ‘hidden’ entrances at general public places, such as arcades and shopping malls. Other changes include imposing new restrictions on gambling advertising, as well as providing for broad-based black economic empowerment within the industry. The new Amendment Bill represents the latest move by South Africa to clamp down on gambling in the country, with the bill having existed in various forms since 2016. Jason Foster, the head of iGaming and African markets at Chalkline Sports, a marketing technology platform that supports customer acquisition and retention for regulated gaming, told iGamingBusiness.com in April that mobile was driving growth in the South African gambling market.Consultants at PwC estimate that South African GGR will grow by 24% this year.“Driving forces include increased smartphone penetration, improved awareness of sportsbook brands, increased mobile data availability and the ability to conveniently transact from a smartphone,” Foster said. 24th July 2018 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Sports betting Bingo Bingo Advertising and location restrictions are among the mooted changes AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

Illinois targets rapid progress on betting legislation

first_img Illinois gambling advocates are hopeful that proposals for legal sports betting and online gambling could be put to lawmakers before the end of this year.A hearing on the “new wave of gaming” – sports betting, fantasy sports and internet gaming – will take place later today (Wednesday) at the state Capitol in Springfield. Leading the session will be pro-gambling Rep Bob Rita, who said he is hopeful the hearing can “build a consensus proposal that could be considered in Springfield after the November election.”Members from two subcommittees – Gaming and on Sales and Other Taxes – will hear from representatives from fantasy sports, online gaming, casinos and technology companies, as well as professional sports leagues and prominent opponents of the sector.Rita has proposed several bills on gaming expansion since becoming the House Democrats’ point person on the sector in 2013. His most recent bill stalled in May, but a spokesperson told iGamingBusiness.com that he has been “encouraged” by developments in New Jersey since the repeal of PASPA.In a statement ahead of the hearing, Rep Rita said: “As I have said from the beginning in working on this issue, gaming expansion presents many tremendous opportunities to create revenue, jobs and economic growth in Illinois.“The gaming landscape has changed significantly since I took on this issue five years ago, and I want to use these hearings to understand how those changes present new opportunities for us to put the right package together as we look to meet budget needs and provide a spark for our economy.”Today’s hearing comes two months after the two subcommittees heard testimony on gaming from stakeholders including municipalities and anti-gambling groups.Illinois would certainly be of great interest for gaming operators. The state is the sixth largest by population with almost 13 million residents and includes major cities such as Chicago, home to two MLB franchises, the NFL’s Chicago Bears and NBA’s Chicago Bulls.Chris Grove, managing director at Eilers & Krejcik Gaming, believes Illinois will be “among the next wave of states to move on regulated sports betting”.He told iGamingBusiness.com: “As with all states, Illinois will have to run the gauntlet of stakeholders with competing agendas and deep wells of political power in order to get a bill done, but I do believe the interest is there.”In a letter ahead of his appearance before the hearing, Jim Ryan, CEO of Pala Interactive and a member of the nonprofit iDEA Growth, called on lawmakers to not overlook the economic benefits of gambling expansion.Ryan wrote mobile wagering is “the future of the industry” and sports wagering is already taking place on “unregulated platforms.”“Illinois needs to make it legal and regulated. Voting for anything less is a lost opportunity for the state’s economy,” Ryan said.Image: Arturo Pardavila III AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Illinois targets rapid progress on betting legislation 17th October 2018 | By contenteditor Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Regions: US Illinoiscenter_img Email Address Capitol hearing today will discuss betting, fantasy sports and online gaming Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Legal & compliancelast_img read more

ASA sanctions BetIndex for ad featuring underage players

first_img The UK Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has sanctioned BetIndex, owner of “football stockmarket” Football Index for featuring five footballers aged under 25 in an advertisement. The ASA ruled that the advertisement must not appear again.On 20 May, BetIndex published a paid-for Facebook ad featuring the images of many footballers including England internationals 19-year-old Jadon Sancho, 24-year-old Raheem Sterling, 18-year-old Callum Hudson-Odoi, 21-year-old Marcus Rashford and French international 20-year-old Kylian Mbappé.The ad also featured the text: “Jadon Sancho is now the football stockmarket’s third most valuable player, with many traders seeing handsome profits,” the values of the players included and the text “Sancho the big mover.”The UK Code of Non-broadcast Advertising and Direct & Promotional Marketing (CAP Code) states that no one who is or appears to be under 25 years old may be featured playing a significant role in gambling marketing communications that are shown outside of the operator’s facility or website.BetIndex argued that the under-25 players’ role in the ad was not significant, as it included many players and that the players were used to illustrate the features of the platform and what consumers would see if using the app.However, the ASA disagreed, ruling that all of the footballers in the ad played a significant role.“We understood the intention of the ad was to illustrate the nature of the gambling app and how it could be played,” the ASA said.“However, we considered that of equal measure was its aim to offer the audience an opportunity to use the app for the purposes of gambling. In that context, while the significance of the players under 25 was no greater than the other players featured, we considered that all listed footballers were the focus of the post, and that each of them played an equally significant role in the marketing communication.”Prior to the ruling, BetIndex had withdrawn the ad and said they would ensure staff receive relevant training on the use of sportspeople under 25 years of age in marketing communications. Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Regions: UK & Ireland ASA sanctions BetIndex for ad featuring underage players The UK Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has warned BetIndex, owner of ‘football stock market’ Football Index for featuring five footballers aged under 25 in one of its advertisements. The ASA ruled that the advertisement must not appear again. Legal & compliancecenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 21st August 2019 | By Daniel O’Boyle Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

Wolf Moon Rising by Betsoft Gaming

first_imgCasino & games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Wolf Moon Rising by Betsoft Gaming 27th August 2019 | By Aaron Noy Dream big, win big. Enter the mystical lands of Wolf Moon Rising and explore a slot filled to the brim with exciting action & a potential of up to 20000x, as well as a lucrative bonus game that pays both ways and DOUBLES your wins. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Dream big, win big. Enter the mystical lands of Wolf Moon Rising and explore a slot filled to the brim with exciting action & a potential of up to 20000x, as well as a lucrative bonus game that pays both ways and DOUBLES your wins.Featuring classic Betsoft slots gameplay mixed up with the big win capability that players desire, Wolf Moon Rising has several exciting features. Collect the FEATHER TALISMANS to trigger 12 free spins that pay both ways and double them up for a chance at amazing wins.Watch for special symbols that will guide you to fortune. The WOLF MOON symbol can appear on any reel and will award an INSTANT WIN. More symbols equal more wins. The game also features a wild mechanic to make for some intense wins. Exciting ways to win in the newest release by Betsoft!Play a demo of the slot here! You can also download the affiliate pack from First Look Games here! Topics: Casino & games Slots Email Addresslast_img read more

ATG bucks Swedish trends with record third quarter

first_img Tags: Online Gambling Race Track and Racino Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter With other operators struggling in Sweden, former horse racing monopoly Aktiebolaget Trav och Galopp (ATG) bucked the trend to report a 12.6% increase in net gaming revenue for the third quarter of 2019 to SEK1.17bn, setting a new company record. With other operators struggling in Sweden, former horse racing monopoly Aktiebolaget Trav och Galopp (ATG) bucked the trend to report a 12.6% increase in net gaming revenue for the third quarter of 2019 to SEK1.17bn, setting a new company record.Hasse Lord Skarplöth, ATG’s president and chief executive, said that it was “gratifying” to see the company’s revenue rise in a year that had proved difficult for the market as a whole.Swedish horse racing — the only product ATG could offer until 1 January 2019 — continued to make up the vast majority of the operator’s SEK1.17bn in net gaming revenue, at SEK1.00bn, down slightly from SEK 1.04bn in 2018. Sports betting in Sweden made up SEK65m in the three months to September 30, while casino games in the country brought in net revenue of SEK67m.In Denmark, into which the company expanded through the acquisition of Ecoys after the opening of the Swedish market, the company made SEK10m from horse racing, SEK6m from sports betting and SEK16m from casino for a total of SEK32m.However, this was largely generated through retail channels, with the land-based contribution rising 28.5% year-on-year to SEK824m, offsetting a 13.4% decline in online revenue to SEK343m.A further SEK80m in agent revenue and SEK138m in other income brought the company’s total revenue to SEK1.39bn, a 16.1% increase from 2018.The company paid SEK235m in gaming taxes for the quarter, as well as SEK110m in personnel costs, SEK554m in other expenses and incurred SEK55m worth of amortisation and impairment costs, bringing operating profit to SEK449m.However, much of this difference in operating profit was due to differences in the way gambling and lottery taxes were considered in Sweden’s old tax regime compared to its new re-regulated market.Where in 2018 the company paid lottery tax, calculated after pre-tax figures, in 2019 the company paid gaming taxes, calculated as an operating expense. This gaming tax was not a feature in 2018, while ATG did not have to pay lottery tax in 2019.Similarly, under the former monopoly system, ATG paid SEK550m of third-quarter revenue in 2018 to funds for horse racing and a further SEK12m as an agreement with the state. In 2019, however, ATG did not have to pay into these funds.As a result, ATG’s pre-tax profit in 2019 was SEK450m, up 42.4% from 2018. The company paid SEK12m in taxes, compared to 2018’s figure of SEK365m, due to the lottery tax.Because of the changes during the market’s re-regulation, ATG’s overall result was a SEK438m profit, a stark difference from 2018, when it posted a SEK49m loss.ATG also provided a breakdown of ‘green customers’ and ‘green revenue’, based on customers that were not considered at risk of developing gambling problems, or with existing issues. A total of 68% of sales were considered ‘green sales,’ a decline from 69% in the second quarter, while 86% of customers were considered ‘green customers,’ in line with Q2.“These are important key figures in our work ahead and is an important part of our contribution to a game-industry that is doing better tomorrow than today,” Skarplöth  said of the ‘green’ figures. “I welcome more companies to follow our example in their interim reports.”While ATG’s revenue and profit both increased in Sweden, the same has not been true for many other operators who do business in the country.Former monopoly Svenska Spel saw a 5.2% decline in revenue and a 45.7% fall in operating profit, which president and chief executive Patrik Hofbauer said was, “not yet at the level we are striving for.”Unibet operator Kindred experienced declines in both overall revenue and profit, as revenue from the Nordic region fell 6.4% to £66.4m.Betsson’s revenue fell 10.6% to SEK1.28bn, meanwhile, following declines in all product verticals, prompting chief executive Pontus Lindwall to talk up the possibility of acquisitions and expansion into new markets.Skarplöth said ATG did not anticipate the market’s struggles, which defied the company’s analysis, but he was pleased to see ATG’s revenues increase regardless.“We continue to gain market share and maintain our position at the top of the podium in the licensed market in Sweden,” Skarplöth said.For the nine months to 30 September, ATG’s net gaming revenue stands at SEK3.26bn. ATG bucks Swedish trends with record third quarter Regions: Europe Nordics Denmark Sweden Horse racing Topics: Sports betting Horse racing 25th October 2019 | By Daniel O’Boyle AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Addresslast_img read more

Portugese igaming revenue grows to €54.1m in Q3

first_img Topics: Casino & games Portugese igaming revenue grows to €54.1m in Q3 Tags: Online Gambling 13th December 2019 | By contenteditor The Portuguese gambling regulator, Serviço Regulação e Inspeção de Jogos do Turismo de Portugal (SRIJ), has revealed record online revenue for the seventh quarter in a row, thanks to casino and sports betting growth. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: Europe Western Europe Portugal AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The Portuguese gambling regulator, Serviço Regulação e Inspeção de Jogos do Turismo de Portugal (SRIJ), has revealed record online revenue for the seventh quarter in a row, thanks to casino and sports betting growth.The total of €54.1m (£45.2m/$60.3m), up from €48.3m in the second quarter and a 39.1% year-on-year rise, was generated by 11 businesses, which held a total of 18 licences by the end of September – up from two operators in the corresponding period in 2018.A total of €23.6m was raised in online gambling tax (IEJO) in the third quarter, up by €6.4m in relation to the same period the previous year.Casino revenue improved from €25.3m to €28.2m quarter-on-quarter – an increase of €8.8m on Q3 of 2018.Online sports betting revenues reached €25.9m in Q3, an increase of €6.4m on the same period in 2018 and up from a total of €23m in the previous quarter.Portuguese sports bettors wagered a total of €114m in the quarter – slightly up on the second quarter figure of €112.1m, but down from the record total of €131.3m posted in the first three months of the year. More than three-quarters of the total amount wagered (77.53%) was on football.There was a sharp quarterly rise in the total spent at casinos, up from €699.8m between April and June to €741.5m between July and September.There was also a significant quarter-on-quarter increase in the number of newly registered online gamblers to a new record of 149,000, up from 102,200 in the second quarter of 2019 and 125,200 in the first quarter of the year. During Q3 of 2019, a total of 354,100 people placed bets online.However, in spite of the significant increases across all of the key metrics, Portugal’s real gambling figures across unlicensed as well as registered websites are likely to be considerably higher.In October, a survey commissioned by the Portuguese Association of Online Gambling and Gambling (APAJO) found that 56% of gamblers continue to bet with unlicensed as well as licensed operators more than three years after legal online gambling was introduced. Casino & games Email Addresslast_img read more

Back to Earth

first_imgCasino & games The launch of legal igaming in Sweden has been a reality check for an industry grappling with stricter approaches to regulation and proved more fraught than it would have liked. But Camilla Rosenberg, director general of the country’s gambling regulator Spelinspektionen, argues it has strong and constructive dialogue with the sector. And, she adds, it’s only the first stage in a process that faces yet more twists and turns ahead.By the end of 2019, bemoaning the fact that the long-awaited launch of regulated igaming in Sweden had turned into a nightmare for operators and became something of a mantra for many commentators.The first full year of regulation saw the Swedish Gaming Authority (Spelinspektionen) take a particularly strict approach to keeping operators in line. A steady flow of fines – and in one case a licence revocation – followed. And the negative developments for the industry have continued into 2020.It’s been a fast-moving and fraught process. And critics have claimed that Swedish players are being pushed to the black market by an overly aggressive government and regulatory authority.On the other hand, Sweden’s approach could be viewed as an example of a new, stricter way of regulating, in a world where the industry’s public standing is much diminished. The Dutch regulator sees Spelinspektionen’s approach as one to emulate, after all.The regulator’s director general Camilla Rosenberg admits that operators definitely were not prepared for Spelinspektionen’s approach to enforcement.“I also think they were unaware of differences in Swedish regulations when it came to consumer protection and other areas,” she says. “Maybe they didn’t have the time or opportunity to put effort into looking over the regulations, or simply expected it to be more similar to Denmark or the UK.“That could have been part of the problem, them not actually realising they were violating rules.”This was not all down to the regulator spotting something it didn’t like and acting fast. The public regularly flagged issues and operators’ wrongdoing. These tips from players often prompted the investigations and eventual punishments.“It was difficult to have an idea of what would happen in the new market, and due to Spelpaus we got a lot of information from the public on what was working and what was not,” she explains. “We didn’t know what to expect, and started to discover multiple violations. Some people think we didn’t do enough, while others thought we were too aggressive.”Industry fightback It’s not one-way traffic; the industry has pushed back. 
There has been a stream of criticism from operators which has now reached the point where the industry is bluntly claiming the authorities are risking having licensees cede the market to the offshore operators.The public statements from both sides often look particularly harsh. Branscheforenigen for Onlinespel (BOS) has been unstinting in its criticism. Many felt the conclusion of a Spelinspektionen report – that the industry was not used to such rough treatment – was seen as dismissive of regulated businesses.“In my opinion we have good discussions and exchange of information [with BOS and Spelbranschens Riksorganisation] on the conditions and challenges of the industry,” Rosenberg says, however.“We think the dialogue works well and that there is a mutual respect between the industry and Spelinspektionen.”Furthermore, operators are not taking the fines issued by Spelinspektionen without complaint. Rosenberg estimates that there are up to 50 ongoing court proceedings. Almost every sanction handed out has been challenged by the industry.In December 2019, it emerged that only Paf had paid its fine. It’s unlikely that number has grown. The appeals process could move through a number of courts, meaning it could be five years before fines are paid.This doesn’t frustrate Rosenberg. “I think it’s part of the game,” she says of the appeals process.“It’s framed legislation, so it needs to be decided by the court how to interpret certain regulations. What is a bonus, for instance, and whether offering something violates the terms.”She argues the courts, regarding challenges to licence durations, have confirmed Spelinspektionen’s decision-making process.This saw a number of operators have their licence duration cut below the full five years, often for financial weaknesses. Some of the regulator’s decisions have been overturned, while other licensees have had their licence terms extended – but kept below five years.“The important thing is the court has ruled we are justified in restricting licences for applicants,” she says. “The court says that is appropriate if certain things are not in place, when the operator is applying.“So by limiting it, the court [effectively] ratifies the process.”Name of the game In Rosenberg’s eyes, the re-regulation of a market is an ongoing process that takes years to finalise. She says it will be “a couple of years” before this process actually comes to an end. Constant change is the name of the game.In the energy industry – where she worked for regulator Energimyndigheten prior to joining Spelinspektionen – re-regulation began in the late ’90s and took “a long time” to get the market functioning as desired.“Since this has been done in an extremely short time, both for us and the industry, there is an ongoing inquiry regarding the gambling market, which started right away,” she explains. “They are looking at marketing [in this review], for instance, and there is an ongoing three-year evaluation to assess the new regulations and how the market is working.“That will give a lot of input to politicians, and there will be new regulations in future – I am sure of it.”Advertising has certainly proved controversial, after Spelinspektionen warned operators over “excessive” advertising shortly after the market opened.Rosenberg says nothing currently limits the volume of advertising, and that after an initial surge that prompted its warning, there has been a balancing out, even a reduction. However, this could be a result of it shifting to social media, or other below-the-line channels.“It will be very interesting to see what measures they advise,” Rosenberg says. That report is due in October this year. As she says, it’s an ongoing process.“Patience is really a virtue when it comes to re-regulation,” she says.Covid controls Yet the sudden and brutal advent of Covid-19 has prompted a step that many stakeholders feel goes too far. Minister for Health and Social Affairs Ardalan Shekarabi, the architect of Sweden’s regulated igaming market, proposed a series of stiff restrictions for operators.This includes a weekly deposit limit of SEK5,000 (£411.36). Sign-up bonuses would be capped at SEK100 per customer. Mandatory limits on playing time are also likely, while the government will explore restrictions on return-to-player (RTP) rates.It will be Spelinspektionen that is responsible for enforcing these new controls. Should they be implemented – and industry commentators believe this to be highly likely – the controls will be enforced until the end of 2020. This has prompted much of the industry warnings.Rosenberg argues that player protection becomes increasingly important in the current situation. This will see Spelinspektionen launch a review of licensees’ social responsibility strategies.Some operators have already dismissed any talk of an uptick in online casino play. However, Rosenberg claims there are “very early indications” that turnover has increased.“These are very early indications and it is a little early to say really,” she adds. “We are awaiting figures for April 2020 to learn more.”If regulation is indeed an ongoing process, however, that sort of action has to be followed up by an industry reaction explaining why certain ideas do not work.This is evident in the proposals to restrict betting on rule violations in sports.“It’s to protect the integrity of the games and of course underage people,” she says, admitting it’s a difficult issue. BOS was quick to condemn the proposal as effectively decriminalising match-fixing.“Oh, that one’s interesting,” Rosenberg says when BOS’ comments are put to her. “That needs another court ruling to say whether that’s actually the case.“So it’s not 100% certain that their interpretation is the right one, but it could well be,” she admits.“The likes of BOS are expected to share their opinion, and we will take that into consideration and see whether we should actually develop new regulations or change the existing regulations.”It’s a difficult case, she adds, possibly the most difficult aspect of Spelinspektionen’s remit. And the industry’s “unambiguous” reaction to these restrictions has at least prompted a rethink, albeit for a bid to limit betting to the top four tiers of football leagues and ban betting on friendlies.Again, Rosenberg says, this an example of the fluidity of regulations. By gathering industry feedback, the regulator can better understand the potential pitfalls of its approach.“It is important to hear the views of various stakeholders,” she says. “As I mentioned earlier, we will see what results come from the referral procedure.”Looking offshore These proposals have all prompted warnings from the industry of licensed operators being forced out of the market, with studies suggesting channelisation rates are falling as players migrate to offshore operators.“We did this survey last year that said 17% of the people gambling online don’t know if they are playing at a licensed operator or not, whereas 3% said they are knowingly playing with unlicensed sites,” she says. “So, what does that mean?“The 17%, one interpretation could be they need more information to choose a player within the licensed system, or they are choosing one within the system because it takes more effort to find an unlicensed operator.”It will follow in the Netherlands’ footsteps by monitoring unlicensed companies offering their sites in Swedish, and local payment solutions. This will be supported by the Swedish police and prosecutors, the Consumer Authority and the Financial Supervisory Authority.Spelinspektionen will also work with regulators in other jurisdictions such as the Malta Gaming Authority and the Gibraltar Ministry of Commerce’s Gambling Division. This will increase the pressure on unlicensed operators in multiple territories.“[In the] inquiry prior to the new Swedish Gambling Act, they did a lot of work and shared a lot of information to different regulatory bodies, and I think all of us agree that cooperation is a very important part of what we do,” Rosenberg says. “We can also put a lot of pressure on operators if we work together. “Now we’re working closely with Malta for instance, [so] if an operator loses their licence in Sweden, it might be a small country, but if we are passing information to the MGA, it risks a much bigger impact.”It has proved much more difficult for operators than anticipated, but at a time when markets that have long been regulated have turned to stricter approaches, Sweden feels increasingly like a test case for a new normal for the industry.Rather than railing against the unfairness of it all, it might be a case of learning the lessons Spelinspektionen is teaching. Back to Earth Tags: Mobile Online Gambling The launch of legal igaming in Sweden has been a reality check for an industry grappling with stricter approaches to regulation and proved more fraught than it would have liked. But Camilla Rosenberg, director general of the country’s gambling regulator Spelinspektionen, argues it has strong and constructive dialogue with the sector. And, she adds, it’s only the first stage in a process that faces yet more twists and turns ahead. By Robin Harrison Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 11th May 2020 | By contenteditor Regions: Europe Nordics Sweden Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Sports betting Strategy Email Addresslast_img read more

Dafabet signs with R. Franco ahead of Spanish debut

first_img Dafabet is finalising its entry into the Spanish sports betting market after selecting R. Franco Digital’s platform to power its operations in the country. Email Address Dafabet signs with R. Franco ahead of Spanish debut AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: Europe Southern Europe Spaincenter_img Topics: Sports betting Tech & innovation Sports betting 8th June 2020 | By contenteditor Dafabet is finalising its entry into the Spanish sports betting market after selecting R. Franco Digital’s platform to power its operations in the country.The Philippines-based brand, which is expected to begin trading in Spain later this year, will integrate its sportsbook into the Spanish gaming technology supplier’s IRIS open-architecture platform. This incorporates payment gateways, player profiles, content, games configuration and reporting systems.The operator continues to use Comtrade Gaming as its lead platform provider, through a deal struck in 2018.​Dimitris Karatzas, chief executive of Dafabet parent company AsianLogic, said success in Spain could lead to further market entries across Europe.“R. Franco is an established market leader with more than five decades of industry experience, so we welcome this agreement enthusiastically,” Karatzas said.“As Dafabet continues to cater to an ever-growing army of fans, we look forward to a successful long-term relationship with the provider, as we look to develop our operations in one of Europe’s most dynamic markets.”R. Franco Group said the deal fits into its expansion plans for 2020, as it seeks to build on its presence in over 50 countries.Javier Sacristan Franco, director of R. Franco Digital, said: “Dafabet has already established its global credentials, so we are thrilled to partner with the company for its Spanish debut.”last_img read more

Tipico receives DGE approval for NJ launch

first_img Tipico receives DGE approval for NJ launch Read more on iGB North America German sports betting giant Tipico has received conditional approval to launch sports betting in New Jersey from the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement (DGE). The imminent launch will be the first in the US for Tipico, which has set up its US operations in the state and also plans to launch igaming when it receives the required approval. The operator has partnered with Atlantic City’s Ocean Casino Resort for the offering. 29th September 2020 | By Aaron Noy Topics: Sports betting Retail sports betting “At Tipico, we knew that New Jersey would be the perfect state for us to kick-start our business in the U.S. because of its sophisticated mobile sports betting audience and mature regulatory and licensing environment,” Adrian Vella, managing director of Tipico’s US business said. Sports betting “With an incredible pool of local talent in the New York metro area, we’re thrilled to establish our headquarters in Hoboken and continue expanding our team.” Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Address AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: US New Jerseylast_img read more

TIU bans Algerian player Ikhlef for match-fixing

first_img Topics: Social responsibility Sports betting Sports integrity 15th December 2020 | By Daniel O’Boyle Sports integrity AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter On 1 January 2021, the TIU will rebrand as the International Tennis Integrity Agency (ITIA). It will continue to just cover betting integrity enforcement in tennis in 2021, before adding doping under its jurisdiction from 2022. Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer Richard McLaren ruled that Ikhlef was guilty of four instances of match-fixing, two instances of soliciting players not to use their best efforts, three instances of failure to report corruption and one charge of failing to cooperate with an investigation. Ikhlef is the seventh player or official to be banned by the TIU in the last six weeks. Last month, two Bulgarian professional players – brothers Karen and Yuri Khachatryan – were handed lifetime and 10-year bans respectively after being found guilty of match-fixing, soliciting other players not to use best efforts and a repeated failure to cooperate with the TIU’s investigation. Then, on 1 December, Enrique López Pérez of Spain – who reached a career-high ATP singles world ranking of No. 154 in 2018 – was found guilty of three separate match-fixing events in 2017. He received an eight-year ban and a $25,000 fine. TIU bans Algerian player Ikhlef for match-fixing Early last week, the TIU announced it handed out a lifetime ban to Ukrainian player Stanislav Poplavskyy for match-fixing and “courtsiding” activities, while it also fined and banned Britain’s George Kennedy for a total of seven months for betting. Later in the week it announced that French line judge David Rocher had been banned for 18 months betting on matches.center_img Late that month Aleksandrina Naydenova, another Bulgarian player, was banned for life for partaking in match-fixing activity multiple times between 2015 and 2019. Email Address D.1.d of the 2016 TACP says that “no covered person shall, directly or indirectly, contrive or attempt to contrive the outcome or any other aspect of any event”. D.1.e says players may not “directly or indirectly solicit or facilitate any player to not use his or her best efforts in any event”.  Ikhlef – who is 25 years old and reached a career-high ATP ranking of 1,739 in 2015 – was found to have breached sections D.1.d, D.1.e, D.2.a.i and Section F.2.b of the TACP. Tags: Tennis Tennis Integrity Unit International Tennis Integrity Agency Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Meanwhile D.2.a.i says a player who is approached “by any person who offers or provides any type of money, benefit or consideration” to influence the outcome of a game must report this interaction to the TIU. Section F.2.b says players and officials must cooperate fully with TIU investigations and must not tamper with evidence. The Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU) has issued a seventh ban in six weeks, giving Algerian player Aymen Ikhlef a lifetime ban after finding 10 breaches of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Programme (TACP) including four counts of match-fixing.last_img read more