Month: June 2021

McLean back to captain England against Wales

first_imgLONDON, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 3: Katy McLean of England looks on during the Autumn Internationals Series match between England Women and New Zealand Women at Esher Rugby Club on December 3, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by Ben Hoskins/ Getty Images) Katy McLeanThe England Women’s team to take on Wales in the RBS 6 Nations this Saturday at Twickenham Stadium, kick off 6:15pm, has been announced and once again Head Coach Gary Street has rung the changes.Darlington Mowden Park Sharks fly-half Katy McLean returns as captain, and she is one of 11 changes to the starting line-up, three of which are positional.Lichfield’s Natasha Hunt will swap her number nine jersey to start her first ever international game at full-back. Hunt, who started her rugby career as a 15, replaces Emily Scarratt who moves back to centre. Kay Wilson returns to the starting line-up on the wing after missing England’s win against Italy through illness while Michaela Staniford is back in the starting line-up.In the forwards, there is a new look front row for this match with Victoria Fleetwood back starting at hooker and Bristol’s Sophie Hemming at tight-head prop. Worcester’s Laura Keates moves to loose-head prop. Lichfield’s Harriet Millar-Mills and Saracens’ Hannah Gallagher are also back in the starting line-up.England Head Coach Street, whose side head into the match on the back of wins over Scotland and Italy and whose side have conceded just three points, said: “I was really impressed with the way Wales played against Scotland. They played a really expansive game, moved the ball around well and scored some cracking tries. They also have some physical ball-carrying forwards and some good pace out wide so with the wide open pitch of Twickenham suiting both team this match should be a cracker.”Saturday will also see flanker Gallagher and No. 8 Millar Mills make their Twickenham debuts whilst fly-half Ceri Large will also make her bow if she is called off the bench. All three players made their England debuts against France in November. Street added: “Playing at Twickenham is a huge opportunity for these players. Playing at the home of England Rugby is an experience you’ll never forget. Coupled with the fantastic support we always receive here it will create an amazing atmosphere that I am sure Hannah, Harriet and Ceri will embrace and rise to the challenge.”Street has also named a bench bursting with experience. Margaret Alphonsi is set to make her first start of this season’s Six Nations campaign, while the likes of Sarah Hunter and Rochelle Clark will be desperate to make their mark. In total, the bench shares 279 caps between them.“We have got some serious experience on the bench and who will no doubt be chomping at the bit to get on, especially Maggie Alphonsi who has been out injured  for the first couple of rounds. She’ll be desperate to get on, make her mark and stake her claim for a place in the starting line-up against France in two weeks time.” Starting XV:15 Natasha Hunt14 Kay Wilson13 Emily  Scarratt12 Rachael Burford11 Michaela Staniford10 Katy McLean (C)9 La Toya Mason1 Laura  Keates2 Victoria Fleetwood3 Sophie Hemming4 Rowena Burnfield5 Tamara Taylor6 Hannah Gallagher7 Marlie Packer8 Harriet Millar-MilsReplacements:16 Amy Turner17 Rochelle Clark18 Margaret Alphonsi19 Sarah Hunter20 Georgina Rozario21 Ceri Large22 Kimberley Oliver LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Europe Round One: Winners and Losers

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LONDON, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 13: Danny Care of Harlequins runs with the ball during the Heineken Cup match between Harlequins and Biarritz Olympique at the Twickenham Stoop on October 13, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Breaking away: Danny Care’s impressive showing boosted his international selection chancesby Ben ColesA THRILLING opening round to the Heineken Cup produced some excellent results and plenty of tries with Harlequins, Ulster, Toulon, Clermont and Saracens all putting down early markers. Here are some of the standout performers and disappointments:Winners:Danny CiprianiOne 20 minute cameo was all it took for Danny Cipriani to make his mark on the Heineken Cup. Sale’s start to the season has been horrible and Cipriani had suffered by losing the No 10 shirt to Nick Macleod, but the former Wasp made a telling contribution off the bench against Cardiff Blues with first a try of his own and then two crucial assists to give Sale the lead, this after being 27-12 down at one point. It was enough to win Cipriani the Man of the Match award and a reminder of his mercurial talent. More please, Danny.Gael FickouThe 18-year old Toulouse centre was another Man of the Match winner after his impressive showing against Leicester Tigers, doing enough in the process to produce a worried “Uh oh” from a watching Brian O’Driscoll. Fickou shone at the IRB U20 Junior World Championship in South Africa earlier this year and produced two excellent kicks against Leicester, collecting one for the only try of the match in miserable conditions.Danny CareWhilst Ben Youngs struggled in Toulouse, with his decision-making being called into question,  Care was outstanding in Harlequins impressive home win against Biarritz. A try-scorer on the evening and playing at a consistently high-tempo, Care’s sniping runs were a nightmare for the Basque visitors defence and his distribution was also strong, putting him in firmly in contention to start for England during the November Internationals. Losers:Cardiff BluesLeading by 15 points well into the second-half thanks to a hat-trick from Alex Cuthbert, the Blues’ Heineken Cup campaign looked like it was off to the perfect start in Salford until Danny Cipriani entered the fray and Sale rallied, winning 34-33. The defensive errors and sin-binning of young scrum-half Lewis Jones will leave Phil Davies hardly relishing the visit of Toulon’s expensively assembled squad next weekend.Edinburgh2011-2012 felt like a landmark year for Edinburgh when they reached the Heineken Cup semi-final for the first time, getting there through an exciting running game and a resolute set-piece. Against Saracens however, last season’s victorious run in the competition felt like an all too distant memory. Edinburgh were as abject as the Saracens were excellent, the visitors’ ruthlessness leading to a five-try rout at Murrayfield. Edinburgh boss Michael Bradley even admitted the scoreline could have been worse.Andy Hazell The opening European fixture between Mont-De-Marsan and Gloucester was far from a classic, but will always be remembered for Hazell’s no-holds barred assault on prop Sebastien Ormaechea. In mitigation, Hazell alleges he was repeatedly gouged before unleashing a flurry of punches and delivering a knee to the head of the defenceless prop, resulting in his first red-card in 12 years. He will doubtless face a disciplinary panel ahead of a lengthy ban.Follow Ben Coles on Twitter @bencoles_last_img read more

Who should be England’s centres?

first_imgEngland have better options to start in midfield at RWC 2015, but Slade is a good squad choice given his ability to play fly-half, centre and full-back. Bringing him into the England environment means he can get to grips with the game plan and come 2019 he is sure to be a crucial member of the team.The other option that allows England to have a kicking game at 12 is to play Owen Farrell there with George Ford at fly-half. The flair of Ford is balanced by the pragmatism of Farrell, who also delivers on the goalkicking and defence fronts, although it didn’t prove successful against Samoa in November.On the defensive: Brad Barritt wraps up Quade Cooper during England’s win over AustraliaDEFENCEBrad Barritt may not have been given any column inches in the attack analysis but he tops the charts in defence. A long-time favourite of Lancaster’s, Barritt’s solidity and reliability without the ball has stood out for both England and Saracens.When Lancaster set about repairing England’s damaged reputation in 2012, Barritt was the perfect man to build the team’s defence around. He has a 97% tackle success rate in the league so far this season – a statistic that none of his rivals come close to – and there is no questioning his commitment and professionalism. But he’s even less likely to pass the ball than Tuilagi and lacks either the power or the footwork to put opposition defences in much of a quandary.As for Eastmond’s 40-minute nightmare in Hamilton in June, that should be considered a blip, the defensive blunders more of a team issue than an individual one. After all, two weeks earlier he stood firm in the face of the All Blacks attack – his ability to get low in the tackle allowing him to heave down bigger men.Defence shouldn’t be seen as a weakness of either Eastmond or Joseph. The Bath pair’s tackle percentages were in the mid to late 80s for the first six league games of this season.Tuilagi loves to make a big hit and has a tendency to rush out of the defensive line to do just that. It’s a trait that did Brian O’Driscoll little harm during his 15-year Test career, although the Irishman was arguably more adept at reading game situations than the younger man. O’Driscoll would risk doing it to snuff out an attack, Tuilagi likes imposing himself physically and doesn’t always time such charges effectively.A good use of his time while he’s sidelined with a groin injury would be video analysis: take match situations and look at when to stay in the defensive line and when to bolt forward. Better decision-making would help him and his team-mates.Bright spark: Kyle Eastmond darts through the South Africa defenceCONCLUSIONSo who to pick? It comes back to that question of balance. Given the physicality of modern-day Test rugby, there needs to be a big, powerful player in midfield. Play two of this type, however, and the back-line’s creativity is limited. Pick two playmakers and you risk being outmuscled. The solution is to have a combination of the two: a clever footballer allied with brute force.In England terms, nobody provides the latter better than Tuilagi. Yes, he has flaws but they are heavily outweighed by the attacking threat he offers. Even the All Blacks struggle to contain the 17st 8lb centre – he almost single-handedly turned the 2012 Test at Twickenham in England’s favour.As for a player to prise open defences in a subtler manner, Eastmond can do that. With so many teams following the ‘bigger is better’ route, picking a player who doesn’t fit the stereotype is a shrewd move. When the man himself doesn’t know what he’s going to do until the last moment, how can a defender plan for it?An Eastmond-Tuilagi 12-13 combination is lacking in the kicking department, but it is a pairing that will worry opponents. Too often in the past ten years England have resorted to ‘defence is the best form of attack’; now is the time to turn that philosophy on its head. BALANCE. IT’S a word used often in every-day life: work-life balance, balanced diet, balance of power. In sports teams, balance is key too. Simply throwing the most talented players together is not always the best course of action. There needs to be a mix of skills and for the players chosen to complement each other.Getting the right balance in England‘s centres has long been a challenge for the national coaches. Will Greenwood and Mike Tindall provided the perfect yin-yang centre pairing when England ruled world rugby in 2003, but since they last started a Test together in March 2004 no duo has got comfortable in the white 12 and 13 jerseys. Numerous players have been tried – 26, to be exact, have started in either of the centre positions – but finding a settled partnership has proved elusive.The sound of the clock ticking down to next year’s World Cup is surely echoing loudly in head coach Stuart Lancaster’s ears and nailing down a midfield pairing will be at the top of his list of priorities. We thought we’d offer a helping hand by analysing the contenders…ATTACKIn terms of danger men, there are few that come close to Manu Tuilagi. Yes, his distribution has been called into question but when you continually break the gain-line and put defenders on their backsides you don’t always need to pass; you can make it across the whitewash on your own. He scored five tries in nine Aviva Premiership games last term – a better return than any of his midfield rivals.There’s no doubt passing is an area of his game that needs work, but he has already shown improvement in recent years. He used to hold onto the ball like a toddler clinging to their favourite cuddly toy but these days he does at least look to offload when going into contact, even though the accuracy when he releases the ball can be wayward.Key figure: Manu Tuilagi troubles the New Zealand defence during the June Test seriesIf Tuilagi needs inspiration he need only look at Ma’a Nonu. The All Blacks centre was once seen as a battering ram but now has a much more rounded game, upping his passing and even his kicking skills. The latter might be a little much to ask of Tuilagi, for now at least!At the other end of the attacking spectrum is Kyle Eastmond. The Bath man chooses to go round rather than through defenders, thanks to his low centre of gravity and footwork that Michael Flatley would be proud of. The fact he’s more Tom Cruise than Chris Hemsworth means he’s harder for the big guys to bring down too; they have to get low or risk being pinged for a high tackle.What’s most impressive about Eastmond, however, is his reading of the game. He is happy to come in at first receiver or position himself in a wider channel, spotting opportunities and backing himself to take them. Perhaps it’s the fact that his formative years were spent in rugby league that mean he’s comfortable taking risks, while many union academy graduates have been taught to follow a prescribed formula. Whatever it is, he’s been the form English centre this season and has skills – physical and mental – that others simply cannot match. He’s not selfish either, as happy creating a try as scoring one.Eastmond’s centre partner at Bath, Jonathan Joseph, can testify to that, often finding himself on the right end of a scoring offload. Mike Catt has long been a fan of Joseph, coaching him at London Irish. The 23-year-old is a silky runner with pace and soft hands, while he also wins praise from Catt for his low error count.Luther Burrell is probably the most rounded contender. Big, strong and physical, he doesn’t quite have the same destructive impact as Tuilagi with ball in hand – few in the world game do – but he is still a handful for defenders to deal with.His distribution is underrated, mainly because he hasn’t had the chance to play at 12 for England, the position he fills so successfully at Northampton. He runs great support lines and should reap the benefits if played in tandem with Tuilagi or Eastmond, as they would with Burrell’s offloading game.Blond ambition: Billy Twelvetrees offers a kicking option but hasn’t been consistentKICKINGNone of the players discussed are renowned for having a varied kicking game. They can do it if necessary but none tend to get huge distance when they put boot to ball or mix things up with the odd chip or grubber.Eastmond might be a playmaker with his hands but Lancaster has more often turned to Billy Twelvetrees as a more traditional second five-eighth for his kicking ability. On paper the Gloucester man appears the perfect inside-centre; in reality his inconsistent performances mean you never know what you’re going to get and neither do those playing alongside him. He’s been given more than his fair share of chances and has failed to regularly deliver, so he should be dispensed with before the World Cup.When it comes to this type of player, Henry Slade is the best long-term selection. The fly-half, 21, has been playing at 13 for Exeter and the extra time on the ball allows him to show the variety in his game. It’s early in his career but he has great hands and a cultured left foot. With more mixing and matching in the autumn, this debate on England’s midfield options is as relevant now as it was when published in Rugby World last month LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img If everyone is fit, Eastmond and Tuilagi should start against Fiji next September, with Burrell on the bench. That combination can deliver success at RWC 2015. It has the right balance.This article appeared in the December 2014 edition of Rugby World magazine. Click here for the latest subscription offers. Central issue: The forwards did well in the autumn but midfield remains a problem area last_img read more

Rugby Strength and Conditioning: A Guide from Rugby World

first_img Many gym-goers base their strength and conditioning training on muscle groups (legs day, chest day, back day, arms day etc) but this is a flawed plan as muscles need to work together to produce movement. So really we should train movements not muscles, writes Simon Nainby.There are six basic movement patterns that we all use in our daily lives and when playing rugby. They are:Squat, Bend, Push, Pull, Twist and Single LegWe group these movements together to perform skills on the pitch such as scrummaging (squat, bend and push), rucking (squat, bend, push, pull) and mauling (squat, single leg, push, pull).Practising good form in these patterns in the gym will allow the moves to become second nature so that when under pressure in a game, you will find it second nature to hit a ruck with a flat back or land from a lineout without turning your knees and ankles in.Knowing these movement patterns and the exercises that train them will help you plan your training sessions to ensure you are efficient in what you do on the pitch.Is It Time To Rethink Strength & Conditioning In Rugby?Here are some rugby strength and conditioning sample exercise videos:Strength and conditioning: SquatThis is a key movement pattern for virtually all sports. It builds strength primarily in the legs and hips (but also core strength) but importantly it develops balance, co-ordination and even flexibility. Done properly squats will help prevent injury as they strengthen the hips, knees and ankles to stay in the correct alignment.Sample exercises:Back SquatFront SquatOverhead SquatStrength and conditioning: PushThe upper body movement of pushing an object away from the body or the body away from an object such as a hand off. There are 2 forms of push – horizontal (arms in front of the chest) and vertical (arms above the head) and they can be done with one hand or two.Sample exercises:Jammer PressBench PressArnold Shoulder PressOverhead PressStrength and conditioning: PullAn upper body movement pulling the body towards something or pulling something towards the body.  Again this can be horizontal or vertical and one hand or two.Sample exercises:Pull upsSuppine PullStrength and conditioning: BendBending at the waist is something we constantly do in rugby as we pick up a ball, tackle, hit a ruck or scrummage or before we jump.  It is also a major source of injury and back pain so learning to keep a natural curve in the lower back as we bend and shoulders squeezed back is very important.Sample exercises: Strength and conditioning training based on muscle movements rather than muscle groups Stephen Moore of the Wallabies spots team mate Wycliff Palu as he bench presses during an Australian Wallabies strength training session (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images) Romanian Deadlift Good MorningStrength and conditioning: Single LegAnything done on one leg which for the most part is running but also includes the following exercises:Step UpBulgarian Split squatLungeOne Leg SquatSingle Leg Romanian Dead LiftStrength and conditioning: TwistRugby involves not only twisting through the torso such as when passing but also resisting twisting movements such as props resisting each other in a scrummage.Sample exercises:Twists: Medicine Ball TwistPush Up and RotateStrength and conditioning: CombosOnce you have good technique in each pattern you can start putting them together in combination exercises that work more than one pattern just as happens on the pitch.Sample exercises:Deadlift – Pull & BendPowerclean – Pull, Bend, SquatGlute Band – Squat & PushPress/Push Press/Jerk – Push, SquatBurpee – Push, Bend, SquatCheck out more Fitness articles herecenter_img Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Danny Cipriani Wonder Pass Blows Spectators Away

first_img Pass master: Danny Cipriani of Gloucester passes the ball, watched by Piers Francis The pass may remind some of Finn Russell’s sensational effort during the most recent Six Nations, against England. Russell gifted Huw Jones with a beautiful pass that eventually led to a Sean Maitland score. The pass was particularly noteworthy, as it was a standout moment in a thrilling Calcutta Cup win for Scotland.You can remind yourself of that brilliant moment below: Lovely pass x— Chris Cusiter (@chriscusiter) September 1, 2018 Gloucester’s new star fly-half wowed viewers with this incredible pass This moment from Cipriani will rightly garner a lot of attention, though, as it is the first significant act of his stay in Gloucester. What a way to endear yourself to the faithful Shed Heads!The fly-half was hurled into the spotlight this summer after a nightclub incident in Jersey while on a team trip with Gloucester. He later pleaded guilty to common assault and resisting arrest at Jersey Magistrates’ Court. His club stood by him, but the RFU drew criticism for calling Cipriani in for a further disciplinary hearing.However, when he provides magical moments like this pass against Saints, there is every reason to focus on his rugby. And as you can see, his pass is one we will be talking about for the next week… Oh my pass @DannyCipriani87 @btsportrugby— Jim Hamilton (@jimhamilton4) September 1, 2018 What a pass that was from Danny Cipriani…— Josh Gardner (@joshgardner) September 1, 2018 Holy crap that is a fantastic pass. Nicely done @DannyCipriani87 https://t.co/1zu64Rmhno— Al Charron (@TheBlade27) September 2, 2018 Gloucester went on to win the match 27-16.Understandably, the sumptuous play had pundits, ex-players and fans alike praising the England fly-half. A gnarly old game, lit up by a shaft of light from Danny Cipriani. Ridiculous pass. Saints frustrated by familiar failings. Conceded 16 penalties.— Nick Mullins (@andNickMullins) September 1, 2018We’re only one week into the Gallagher Premiership. There is a lot more rugby ahead. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Danny Cipriani Wonder Pass Blows Spectators AwayGloucester Rugby signed Danny Cipriaini in the summer just for moments like this. Near the end of the first half, with Gloucester holding a narrow lead over Northampton Saints at 14-11, advantage was given to the Cherry & Whites. Cipriani, with space opening up on his right, floated a sensational pass into the path of Charlie Sharples, who ran in the score.Watch it here: Let’s hope it is a season full of flashy and classy moments like this!Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Five things to watch in the European Champions Cup

first_imgThe opening weekend of the Heineken Cup is upon us and Jacob Whitehead highlights some key questions for this season’s tournament LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Five things to watch in the European Champions Cup Will Exeter show any signs of snapping their European hoodoo? The Champions Cup has not been a happy hunting ground for Exeter Chiefs. In six European appearances, all they can show for their efforts is a solitary quarter-final in 2015-16, failing to emerge from their group on every other occasion.Seeing as their form has been so dominant in the Gallagher Premiership over recent seasons, this discrepancy is deeply puzzling. This week will see an early test as they travel to the Bay of Biscay to face La Rochelle, a freewheeling side who haven’t quite hit their straps yet this season.New boy: Stuart Hogg in action for Exeter Chiefs (Getty Images)The danger for Exeter is that they tripped up last season in a similar situation, losing 29-25 to Castres in their second pool game – a result which was the difference as they failed to escape the group.Exeter signed marquee players such as Stuart Hogg in part to give them European X-factor – will he inspire them out of their pool? Or will La Rochelle’s all-star back-line, comprised of Kiwi, Fijian and French talent, ambush the Chiefs?What sort of side will Saracens be this season? The punishment given to Saracens this week for breaching the salary cap rules is one of the biggest stories in rugby this decade. Fined more than £5m and docked 35 points by Premiership Rugby, it looks as if survival will be the name of the game for the men in black this season.Indeed, the defending champions failed to send any representation to last Wednesday’s Champions Cup launch, which came the day after the sanctions were announced. Director of rugby Mark McCall admitted that avoiding Premiership relegation was the club’s priority, and that they may have to sacrifice any continental ambitions.However, there is hope for Saracens. A young side, shorn of international talent and led by Manu Vunipola at fly-half, has performed impressively with their backs against the wall. First the academy graduates won with the last kick of the game against London Irish, before claiming a stunning win against a full-strength Gloucester at Kingsholm, cursed all the way by a raucous Shed stand.This week’s challenge will be even tougher, with Saracens expected to play the same group of players in Paris against Racing 92. The new La Défense Arena is one of the most intimidating venues in club rugby, while Racing themselves were Champions Cup finalists as recently as 2018’s showpiece. A chastening Sunday afternoon could await.Can a French club challenge? Speaking of Racing, they will be one of the two prime French contenders in the competition this year. Finn Russell will be more settled in his second year at the club, whilst Virimi Vakatawa was in the form of his life at the World Cup. Juan Imhoff, Teddy Thomas and Simon Zebo are a box-office back three.Attacking threat: Racing wing Teddy Thomas runs in a try (Getty Images)However, the best performing French side in Europe last year were Toulouse, who have spearheaded the current youth movement in French rugby. They sensationally defeated Leinster away, and although they fell to the same side in the semi-finals, will back themselves to be potential winners this year.Romain Ntamack was in ominously good form in a 34-8 win over Clermont Auvergne this week, whilst Thomas Ramos, Sofiane Guitoune and Antoine Dupont (probably the best scrum-half in the northern hemisphere right now) should all start for France. With the glue of New Zealanders Jerome Kaino and Charlie Faumuina in the forwards, they are approaching completeness as a team.Related: Toulouse trio Antoine Dupont, Romain Ntamack and Thomas Ramos Contenders: Players at the Champions Cup launch in Cardiff (Getty Images) center_img They will travel to Johan Ackermann’s Gloucester on Friday night in the pick of the weekend’s games. Pass that tough test, and they’ll be favourites to win Pool Five.Will the Ospreys fly the flag for Wales? This year the Ospreys are the only Welsh team competing in the Champions Cup, after they beat the Scarlets 21-10 in the play-off between the two fourth-ranked teams in the Pro14.However, European competition seems to have arrived at the worst possible time for the region, who have lost five of their last six games. Southern Kings won away in Swansea this weekend – so how will Ospreys cope with being in a tough group with Munster, Saracens and Racing 92?Bad run: Ospreys lost to Southern Kings at the weekend (Getty Images)They have a massive injury list, including long-term absentees Gareth Anscombe and Cory Allen, but it will be interesting to see how some of the region’s young stars will cope at the highest level of club competition.Centre Tiaan Thomas-Wheeler is tipped for the highest honours, whilst scrum-half Harri Morgan is a real livewire. Could they save Welsh face and shock Munster this weekend?Related: Hotshot Tiaan Thomas-WheelerNorthampton and Lyon are both in brilliant domestic form – who will crack? When running through French contenders for the European Cup I omitted one team – Lyon – whose recent performances in the Top 14 have seen them top the table with only one loss all season.They face Northampton, who suffered their first loss of the season last weekend away at Bath, and have looked like the early Premiership pacesetters. Saints have uncovered a golden generation of young talent, which included giant prop Ehren Painter, scrum-half Alex Mitchell, stand-off James Grayson, centre Fraser Dingwall and full-back George Furbank.This group of players showed a small taste of what they were capable of in last year’s Premiership, but seem to have come into their own after a whole pre-season of working with Chris Boyd, who showed his penchant for youth development at both New Zealand U20 and the Hurricanes.Lyon’s doughty forwards were fairly untouched by the World Cup and have new signing Demba Bamba back from a thigh injury, ready to show why he’s one of the most highly-rated talents in French rugby.Josua Tuisova and Taqele Naiyaravoro may face off on opposing wings – imagine the impact that could result in. This weekend an unstoppable force will meet an immovable object (at least based off domestic form) and one will have to give. The December issue of Rugby World magazine – the ultimate RWC 2019 review – is on sale now. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Ken Scotland, the Lion with a romantic touch

first_imgBeing capped by Scotland ticked off one of the three ambitions he had when leaving school. The others, both also happily achieved, were to pass a Latin exam so he could get into Cambridge and to marry his sweetheart Doreen.Life aim: marrying Doreen on Easter Monday 1961, almost seven years to the day after their first dateHe and Doreen have moved around a lot, Scotland’s career in management consultancy – often centred on improving factory productivity – taking him to various locations in England’s East and West Midlands, and to County Down, before he returned north.On being posted to Aberdeen, he played for the Aberdeenshire club and for North Midlands for seven seasons, a period that coincided with him losing his Test place to Stewart Wilson.He retired from first-class rugby aged 33 in 1969 but, with sons playing at Heriot’s, he started refereeing and joined the Heriot’s FP committee. He was chairman of selectors in 1976-77 and used to have selection lunches with club captain Andy Irvine.Scotland was still playing a bit of social rugby in the mid-Seventies and in one game against Merchiston Castle School came up against a young scrum-half called Roger Baird, later an international winger. The opposition in Scotland’s very first game in senior rugby, at the 1955 Kelso Sevens, had included Baird’s father, also called Roger.Robbed! Scoring v NZ Maoris on the 1959 Lions tour – it was wrongly disallowed for a ‘knock-on’ (Getty)Scotland’s work career, including several years looking after a castle on the Isle of Arran for the National Trust, makes interesting reading. Not least when Neil Armstrong arrived by helicopter for a look-around – the astronaut had Scottish roots in Langholm. Today Ken and Doreen live in retirement in Edinburgh, where Ken watches club rugby most Saturdays.He says that backs in the Sixties had no incentive to pass the ball because of the laws. In the aftermath of the infamous Scotland-Wales game of 1963, the one cited as having 111 lineouts, he was asked to write an essay for a journal. He reproduces it in his book and it details how rugby lost its way from 1950 to 1965, as the equilibrium between backs and forwards tilted too far towards forwards. The result was years of defensive, negative rugby.Specialisation among forwards took away the uncertainty of who would win the set-piece contests – with a knock-on effect on how sides set up. “It became virtually impossible to start a handling movement directly from a scrummage or lineout,” he writes.His remedies for the space-starved modern game are equally engrossing, so much so that RW contacted him for an article that is published in our forthcoming February 2021 issue. Scotland was pottering about in the garage, busy as always, when we called him.BUY NOW from AmazonKen Scotland: The Autobiography is published by Polaris, RRP £17.99. Give it a read. Ken Scotland, the Lion with a romantic touchYou’re never too old to write your memoirs, as Ken Scotland has shown. Born a couple of weeks after Jesse Owens was winning all those gold medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, the now 84-year-old Scotland has penned his autobiography – without recourse to a ghostwriter – some six decades after the high point of his distinguished rugby career.The Scotsman was 22 when he departed for the 33-match, five-month 1959 Lions tour of New Zealand, Australia and Canada. He was to play five of the six Tests, four at full-back and one at centre, and was named as one of the five Players of the Year in the NZ Rugby Almanack.Scotland kept a diary of the tour and records its highs and lows with assiduous attention. The Lions averaged five tries a game and, despite little meaningful second-phase ball to play with, their Test back-line forged a reputation as one of the best of all time.Scotland, 5ft 10in and 11st 2lb, was pivotal to the Lions’ exploits, not least because of a versatility that saw him occupy every position behind the scrum except wing. Former Lions captain Arthur Smith rated him the best passer of a ball he ever played with, while Tom Kiernan, the 1968 Lions skipper, called Scotland the finest player of his generation.Small wonder: Scotland (front row, second left) in the Heriot’s School first XV team photo of 1952-53He was a creator, not a finisher, and racked up 27 Scotland and five Lions caps before retiring from international rugby at the age of 28. “He played classical rugby with a romantic touch,” says veteran journalist Allan Massie in the foreword.Scotland’s book charmingly evokes the days of old when young men had to do two years of National Service, and a pie and pint in the NAFFI cost seven and a half pence. There’s no tittle-tattle; in fact, the only discordant note that springs readily to mind is a “decidedly frigid” relationship with next-door neighbours in Berwickshire.Scotland was educated at George Heriot’s School and as a player modelled himself on Irish great Jack Kyle, who he watched in the flesh just two or three times (there was no TV).His other sporting hero was Godfrey Evans, the Kent and England wicketkeeper, and Scotland was later to play for his country at cricket. He once hit scores of 136 and 138 in the space of two days in senior club cricket.Army detail: on parade with the Duke of Edinburgh and some serious top brassHe was still a schoolboy when he helped Scotland beat England 29-3 in an age-grade International at Richmond, having a hand in all five Scottish tries.It was the only time he played on a winning side against England, the biggest regret of his career. Perhaps most painful was a 3-3 draw in 1962, when he missed a couple of kickable penalties near the end that denied the Scots a Triple Crown.His Test debut came in Paris in 1957, when he played at full-back despite almost no experience in the position. His usual role was fly-half but that spot was filled by Micky Grant, the regular full-back for Harlequins. Such were selectorial whims at that time!Scotland hadn’t kicked for any of the representative teams he’d played in since leaving school, yet was appointed goalkicker on his debut. He had a pretty average game but slotted the points in a 6-0 win – he was up and running. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS More than 60 years after starring for the Lions, the former Scotland full-back remains as sharp as a tack. Rugby World laps up the wisdom found in his recent autobiography Cambridge blue: Ken Scotland dashing down the flank during the 1958 Varsity Match at Twickenham TAGS: Book Review Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Rapidísimas

Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rapidísimas Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Por Onell A. SotoPosted Jun 27, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal News Service] La Suprema Corte de Justicia de Estados Unidos rechazó como inconstitucionales tres de las cuatro porciones de la controversial ley SB1070 de Arizona que pretendía regular la inmigración indocumentada a ese estado. Fueron anuladas las partes de la ley que dicen que pedir trabajo en Arizona y circular por el estado sin papeles migratorios fuesen considerados un delito para los indocumentados. Sin embargo, la policía sí puede solicitar documentos migratorios.La destitución del presidente Fernando Lugo de Paraguay ha causado toda clase de reacciones en América Latina y Europa. Sus adversarios le acusan de inepto, mujeriego y quererse perpetuar en el poder. Mientras que sus amigos lo consideran un hombre sencillo y afable (fue obispo de San Pedro) con buenas intenciones que ha sufrido de cáncer y que encontró en el país más problemas de los que se imaginaba. Varios países han roto relaciones con Paraguay y en la actualidad se piensa en un plan para reponerlo en el cargo. Muchos califican la acción del congreso de “golpe de estado”, mientras que otros afirman que fue un hecho totalmente apegado a las leyes del país. Su mandato se extenderá hasta fines del año que viene. El nuevo presidente, Federico Franco, tiene 49 años es cardiólogo. Él y su esposa Emilia tienen 30 años de casados y cuatro hijos adultos. Ella es diputada. La familia va a la iglesia regularmente.La Iglesia Anglicana de Canadá ha creado una nueva diócesis en el norte del país que incluye las parroquias de Rupert’s Land. Esto ha sido una aspiración de los pueblos indígenas de la zona que desde hace tiempo habían hecho la petición. La nueva jurisdicción eclesiástica desmembrada de la diócesis de Keewatin incluye 16 comunidades indígenas que hablan cinco idiomas diferentes y estará bajo el cuidado pastoral de la arcediana Lydia Mamakwa que fue consagrada obispa en mayo del 2010.El consejo directivo de la Federación Luterana Mundial, se reunió la semana pasada en Bogotá bajo el lema “Juntos por un mundo justo, pacífico y reconciliado”. En el evento participaron representantes de más de 70 países. Las reuniones estuvieron presididas por Munib Youman, obispo luterano de Jordania y Tierra Santa. El obispo episcopal Francisco Duque les dio la bienvenida a nombre del comité ecuménico local.En medio de la violencia, la escasez de alimentos y medicinas en Homs, Siria, una monja y un pastor protestante rehusaron abandonar un hogar de ancianos regenteado por las iglesias. “Si perecemos no seremos los primeros mártires, nuestra conciencia no nos permite abandonar a estos ancianos indefensos”, dijo la pareja a un corresponsal de prensa.En representación de millones de cristianos evangélicos, un grupo de 150 prominentes líderes religiosos de Estados Unidos anunciaron la creación de la “Mesa Evangélica de Inmigración” al tiempo que firmaron una declaración de principios para la reforma de inmigración que fue entregada al presidente Barack Obama, al Senado y a la Cámara de Representantes. Los dirigentes pidieron a demócratas y republicanos que lideren a la nación de manera conjunta, hacia una solución bipartidista.La prensa internacional se ha hecho eco de una serie de fotografías del obispo católico romano argentino Fernando María Bargalló, obispo de Merlo y Moreno, abrazado con una dama en una playa cerca de Puerto Vallarta en México, pero que según el prelado “es una amiga de la infancia”. Bargalló que es presidente de Cáritas para América Latina, pidió perdón por “si he ofendido a alguien”.El Centro de Filantropía de la Universidad de Indiana informó que debido a la situación económica de Estados Unidos, las donaciones a las instituciones religiosas disminuyeron este año en 1.7 % por segunda vez, según el folleto “Giving USA”.La jueza Alicia Corral de Santa Rosa, capital de la provincia de La Pampa, Argentina, multó al párroco local por tocar las campanas y hacer un “ruido incómodo” tres veces al día por más de ocho minutos. La jueza dijo que la comunidad había protestado por el ruido y que si el párroco no dejaba de tocar las campanas, éstas serían confiscadas. El párroco a su vez presentó un documento con más de mil firmas en el que dice “dejen a la iglesia tranquila”.El gobierno de Cuba cobrará impuestos por la importación de alimentos para todos los viajeros que ingresen al país a partir del 18 de junio. Todos los pasajeros tendrán que pagar este impuesto sean o no residentes de Cuba.PROMESA DIVINA. Porque todo aquel que pide, recibe; y el que busca, halla; y al que llama, se le abrirá. San Lucas 11:10 read more

ALASKA: Summer storms cut remote village’s water supply

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID ALASKA: Summer storms cut remote village’s water supply School-age children evacuated to regional hub Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rev. Joyce Parry-Moore says: Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY September 12, 2012 at 1:17 pm Love from a former Alaskan, and many time visitor to beloved Kotzebue. My heart and prayers go out from St. Bartholomew’s here in Livermore, CA. Please tell us how we can help support Kivalina and other villages during this time of climate crisis. Joyce+ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Lynette Wilson Posted Sep 6, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Comments (1) Rector Belleville, IL Teck Cominco Alaska, Inc. delivered drinking water to the Kivalina community on Sept. 2. Photo/Janet Mitchell[Episcopal News Service] Harsh weather conditions and extreme storm warnings are nothing new for the residents of Kivalina, but the late summer’s heavy rains and subsequent rising water levels have left the island community without clean water and delayed the start of school locally.“According to a friend, NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] had predicted a few months back that they expected 2012 weather systems to be on the extreme side. That prepared some of us mentally to expect worse than usual weather patterns, but we take it for granted that the weather is just going to be stronger than normal,” said Colleen E. Swan, a member of Kivalina Epiphany Episcopal Church and Kivalina Church Women treasurer, in an e-mail to ENS.“I never gave much thought to what may come with it, such as having our water pumping system fall into the water and not being able to fill our water holding tanks. I never thought that more rain water meant less drinking water or that our school start-up would be cancelled ‘til further notice,” she continued.Heavy rains flooded the community’s landfill and damaged its water system, which includes a pipeline that carries drinking water from the nearby Wulik River to the village’s two water-storage tanks, according to news reports and updates to the Kivalina Water Facebook page.“… we lost part of our pipes into the river, as well as the concrete block holding the end up by the mouth of the river. We cannot pump until we find new pipes but we have no monies to purchase any,” said Janet Mitchell, a city administrator and secretary of the Kivalina Epiphany Church Mission Committee in an Aug. 29 post on the Facebook page.The onset of winter may further complicate repairs, said Mitchell in a CNBC News story Sept. 5.In addition to the water tanks, the pipeline supplies water to village’s school and its teacher housing. School was scheduled to start on Aug. 20, and according to news reports, school officials expect school to begin in Kivalina by Oct. 1. (While the school, the teacher housing, the washeteria and the health clinic have running water, residents of Kivalina don’t have indoor plumbing in their homes and carry potable water from storage tanks.)The village of Kivalina sits on the tip of a six- to eight-mile-long barrier island – a quarter-mile at its widest – some 80 to 120 miles above the Arctic Circle between the Chukchi Sea and the Kivalina Lagoon in Alaska. It is home to about 400 Inupiat people and reachable only by plane and boat in the summer and plane, and snowmobile in winter.“We are in a catch-22 situation where the community needs the fresh water from the rain. But at the same time, all of this rain is also causing a delay in filling the water tanks because of the high turbidity level. And that was the situation till more rain came and damaged the water pumping system. I fail to understand why the state of Alaska has not declared a disaster, especially when this situation has caused our school to remain closed,” said Swan.Kivalina and the Northwest Arctic Borough, a regional governing body, both have declared the situation a disaster, the borough’s declaration made emergency funds available for the purchase of drinking water. The Diocese of Alaska also sent $1,000 to Kivalina for the purchase of drinking water, according to a Facebook post by Mitchell.“Once again our family in Kivalina is struggling against the forces of nature. Consistent with the spirit of a people who have thrived for centuries in one of the harshest climates inhabited by humankind, the people of Kivalina are working to provide for their village despite yet another unique natural ‘disaster,’” said Diocese of Alaska Bishop Mark Lattime.“People who know the story of the village of Kivalina, understand that the village is slowly eroding into the ocean. The process of erosion is accelerating with the loss of sea ice caused by warming oceans. Recently, however, Kivalina is facing rising waters and flooding due to an unprecedented weather pattern that has brought rainfall to the area for several weeks. So far rainfall has exceeded 12 inches. The result has been the complete breakdown of the community’s fresh water supply.”Not only has the flooding washed away the pump that draws fresh water from the river source that supplies the village, but the flood has also caused the river to become too turbid to filter, making it impossible, or useless, to drawn water from the river by hand. Adding to the challenge, the village’s power generation plant, in an effort to provide lower-cost electricity, has been burning “used” oil. The result is that the exhaust from the plant has made gathering rain water also impractical as runoff from roofs is polluted by soot—the byproduct of burning used oil, Lattime added.The children of Kivalina have been evacuated to Kotzebue, a regional hub, where they can attend school while the village works to restore its water resource. The school in Kivalina remains closed, said Lattime.“Despite on-site inspections by the [U.S.] Department of Homeland Security and the governor [of Alaska], Kivalina has been left to address the problem on their own. However, just as it requires enormous cooperation to successfully hunt a bowhead whale, the traditional food source of these Inupiat people, the people of Kivalina are working together to solve their water crisis. The plan is to coordinate volunteers using ATVs and small boats to travel up the Kivalina River to find areas where the water is less turbid and able to be properly filtered for human consumption. These volunteers will collect the water in portable containers and, upon returning to the village, the water will be used to refill the community water tank.“Monumental task? You bet. Will they succeed at it? Most certainly,” said Lattime.  “Monumental tasks that require cooperation and hard work define the traditional spirit of the people of Kivalina. Nevertheless, they can use help. Mostly they need financial resources to help purchase fuel for the equipment they are using to get to the clear water. The price of gasoline in Kivalina is over $6 per gallon, and it will take hundreds of gallons of fuel to make enough trips to refill the community water tank.”The Diocese of Alaska, after consulting with the leadership in Kivalina and asking them what they needed, contributed $1,000 to aide their efforts. It is certain that they could use more financial support until their fresh water system is back in full operation and the river has settled, said Lattime.“Then they can return to working on a solution to the slow erosion of their island home,” he said.Early this summer at the 77th General Convention in Indianapolis, Indiana, Austin Swan Sr., a deputy from the Diocese of Alaska, and a resident of Kivalina, shared his firsthand experience with climate change and its threat to the community’s continued existence during a hearing on Resolution B023.Of the 200 native coastal communities in Alaska, varying degrees of erosion affect about 180 of them, according to the federal government’s General Accounting Office. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has said that Kivalina is one of three native communities in need of relocation.As explained in the resolution’s explanation, Kivalina “has been ever-increasingly at risk because of global climate change. Loss of sea ice has led to increased coastal erosion, land failure, and unreliable, if not perilous, conditions for the practice of subsistence hunting.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

La costa oriental de EE.UU. se encamina lentamente hacia la…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 La costa oriental de EE.UU. se encamina lentamente hacia la recuperación luego del huracán Sandy Haití y Jamaica sufrieron un azote brutal In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Debris litter the beach at Casino Pier three days after Hurricane Sandy came ashore in Seaside Heights, New Jersey, Nov. 1. REUTERS/Steve Nesius[Episcopal News Service] Las diócesis de Nueva York, Nueva Jersey y Connecticut seguían evaluando los daños y el caos causados por el huracán Sandy mientras la región se encaminaba lentamente hacia la recuperación el 1 de noviembre.Grandes secciones de los tres estados seguían sin energía eléctrica el 1 de noviembre, a muchas de las cuales les faltó la electricidad antes de que llegara la “supertormenta” del 29 de octubre, y los informes de daños y apagones siguen apareciendo.La diócesis de Newark reabrió sus oficinas el jueves, y mantuvo su horario regular de servicios.“Sentimos que realmente nos libramos”, dijo Nina Nicholson, la directora de comunicaciones y tecnología de la diócesis, en una llamada telefónica con ENS. Añadió que hasta donde ella sabe ninguno de los miembros de la diócesis resultó lesionado y los daños fueron mucho menores de lo que se esperaba.La parroquia episcopal de Todos los Santos [All Saints] en Hoboken, una de las áreas más afectadas de la región, sufrió daños en su edificio del Jubileo, en el que entraron de cinco a siete pies de agua. La parroquia misma se libró de cualquier daño. Y en la iglesia de Santa María [St. Mary’s] en Sparta, un árbol cayó sobre el jardín de recordación de la parroquia. Por otra parte, agregó Nicholson, la diócesis ha recibido informes de árboles caídos, canaletas destrozadas, aparatos de aire acondicionado arrancados de ventanas y persistentes faltas de energía eléctrica.Al menos cinco iglesias de Newark tienen electricidad y servicio de Internet inalámbrico (Wi-Fi) y han abierto sus puertas a los miembros de la comunidad:* San Pablo [St. Paul’s] en Chatham (200 Main St., 973-635-8085)* San Pablo [St Paul’s] en Englewood (113 Engle St., 201-568-3276)* Santiago Apóstol [St. James’] en Montclair (581 Valley Road en la esquina de la avenida Bellevue, 973-744-0270)* San Lucas [St. Luke’s] en Montclair (73 South Fullerton Ave., 973-744-6220)* Iglesia del Calvario [Calvary Church] en Summit (31 Woodland Ave. 908-277-1814)John Sosnowski, canónigo del Ordinario de la Diócesis de Nueva Jersey, en un mensaje publicado el 31 de octubre en la página web de la diócesis, instaba a los miembros a incorporarse a su página de Facebook para mantenerse al tanto de las necesidades según fueran surgiendo y responder a ellas.“Hemos recibido ofertas de asistencia de iglesias que querían ayudar. Les instamos a utilizar la página de Facebook [de la diócesis] para crear conexiones entre las iglesias y notificarse mutuamente respecto a necesidades inmediatas de las cuales estuvieran conscientes. Al crear estos vínculos, una iglesia puede ser capaz de responder a las necesidades de otra de manera más expedita, en lugar de comunicarse a través de la Casa Diocesana”, dijo él en su mensaje.A los de la Diócesis de Nueva Jersey que necesiten asistencia en una escala mayor se les ha pedido que se dirijan a Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales.El último aviso de la Diócesis de Long Island fue una actualización a las 10:25 A.M. del 31 de octubre en la que informaban que los daños de la diócesis seguían siendo menores, con Todos los Santos [All Saints] en Great Neck, en la costa norte de Long Island, que había perdido todos sus carteles y un árbol había caído en San Pablo [St. Paul’s] también en Great Neck, ocasionando que la iglesia perdiese una canaleta del techo. Los daños a las dos iglesias de Great Neck vienen a sumarse al que ya se habían reportado en el columbario de San Beda [St. Bede’s] en Syosset.El campus diocesano sufrió una extensa “caída de árboles” y continúa sin electricidad, según el parte actualizado.Katie Mears, directora del programa de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales para Preparación y Respuesta a Desastres en EE.UU., y Andrew Dietsche, obispo coadjutor de Nueva York, se reunieron el 1 de noviembre con el clero de la Diócesis de Nueva York que se había visto afectado [por el huracán] “para compartir información, coordinar recursos e identificar zonas con necesidades importantes”, según una actualización publicada en la página web de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales.Mears también ha estado trabajando con los Coordinadores Diocesanos para Desastres en las diócesis de Long Island, Nueva Jersey y Newark, informaba la actualización.(Los Coordinadores Diocesanos para Desastres son nombrados por el obispo para servir de enlaces entre Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales y el liderazgo diocesano, y para alentar y ayudar a la diócesis y a sus congregaciones en la preparación, planificación y respuesta a un desastre).En la Diócesis de Nueva York, dependiendo de la región, se ha pedido a los miembros que se pongan en contacto con el coordinador de desastres de la diócesis, el Rdo. Stephen Harding, y el de la región del Hudson Medio.En un mensaje grabado en un buzón de voz el 2 de noviembre, Harding dijo que Staten Island y la 2a. Región habían sido azotadas por la tormenta de manera particularmente cruel, con muchos árboles caídos, pero hasta ahora la diócesis no ha recibido informes de daños estructurales catastróficos.Han implementado un mecanismo para responder localmente, con personas de la region del Hudson Medio que le prestan ayuda a las de la 2da. Región.Y la iglesia de San Marcos [St. Mark’s] en el Bowery, iba a abrir sus puertas el 2 de noviembre de 10 A.M. a 4 P.M. con ayuda de voluntarios de la iglesia provenientes de más arriba de la calle 34 para brindar agua y comida.Ian Douglas, el obispo de la Diócesis of Connecticut, está en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda, asistiendo a la reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, pero se mantiene en contacto con la diócesis por teléfono. Los obispos sufragáneos James Curry y Laura Ahrens han estado al tanto de las parroquias, dijo Karin Hamilton, canóniga de comunicación y medios de difusión, en una llamada telefónica con ENS desde su oficina.En un mensaje a la diócesis, los obispos de Connecticut dijeron: “Esta terrible tormenta ha creado muchas dificultades en muchas de nuestras ciudades y pueblos, entre nuestro clero y feligreses, así como entre nuestros amigos y vecinos. En nuestra respuesta a sus necesidades, en oración y acción, podemos ser agentes de la misión de Dios en la comunidad más amplia. En este momento de recuperación nos encantaría conversar con las parroquias y deanatos respecto a cómo nuestra Iglesia puede servir en las zonas que han sido afectadas. Somos aliados de Respuesta a Desastres en Estados Unidos de Ayuda y Desarrollo episcopales. Y ellos cuentan con recursos a los que podemos tener acceso y los cuales podemos utilizar para ayudar en la recuperación de nuestros barrios”.Ha habido algunos daños, “pero no tan grandes que no podamos hacerles frente”, dijo Curry en una llamada telefónica. “Para lo que nos preparamos es para ver de qué manera podemos ser útiles a la comunidad mayor”.Desde que [el huracán] Sandy tocó tierra cerca de Atlantic City, Nueva Jersey, el 29 de octubre, ha cobrado las vidas de más de 56 personas en Estados Unidos y Canadá, además de por lo menos 76 personas que perdieron su vida cuando Sandy atravesó el Caribe.Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales también ha estado en contacto con la Diócesis Episcopal de Haití, donde los daños ocasionados por el huracán Sandy parecen haber excedido a los causados por el huracán Isaac a fines de agosto. Las regiones agrícolas en el sur del país resultaron duramente azotadas, despertando inquietudes tocantes a los altos precios y a la posible escasez de alimentos frescos. La diócesis está haciendo una evaluación de las necesidades en las zonas afectadas y continúa recibiendo informes del clero local, lo cual contribuye a configurar los planes de respuesta que actualmente se encuentra en proceso.La Diócesis de Jamaica y la Iglesia en la Provincia de las Antillas (CPWI por su sigla en inglés) también han sufrido extensos daños y se encuentran actualmente en el proceso de evaluar los daños, dijo la Rda. Glenda McQueen, funcionaria de la diócesis encargada de [las relaciones con] América Latina y el Caribe, en un mensaje electrónico a ENS el 1 de noviembre.La República Dominicana sufrió extensas inundaciones y unas 300 personas han buscado albergue en las iglesias de la Diócesis Episcopal de la República Dominicana, y en Cuba la región oriental de la isla resultó duramente afectada, confirmó el obispo Wilfrido Ramos-Orench, funcionario de la Iglesia Episcopal para la IX Provincia, en un correo electrónico enviado a ENS el 2 de noviembre.En una declaración dada a conocer el 1 de noviembre, el Muy Rdo. Gary Hall, deán de la Catedral Nacional de Washington, dijo: “Le damos gracias a Dios por los meteorólogos cuya previsión y dedicación impidieron que este fenómeno sin precedentes nos tomara de sorpresa. También ofrecemos nuestras oraciones de gratitud por aquellos cuya labor ha servido para aliviar el sufrimiento y que continuarán realizándola, especialmente en las regiones más afectadas de Nueva York y Nueva Jersey, en el transcurso de las próximas semanas.“En este período cuando la Iglesia universal honra a todos los santos y a los fieles difuntos, los más de cien individuos que han muerto debido a esta tormenta están en nuestras mentes y estarán en nuestras oraciones”, añadió Hall. “Sus muertes resaltan la importancia de una infraestructura estable y los riesgos de un clima inestable. Rindiéndole tributo a sus vidas y siguiendo el ejemplo de tantos que ayudaron a nuestro país en este momento de prueba, luchemos por encontrar estabilidad y dirección en cualquier tipo de nuevas tormentas que nuestra sociedad y nuestro planeta puedan enfrentar. Que podamos dar continua alabanza y gracias a Dios por todas las personas y lugares que nos importan, reafirmando la disposición a compartir los talentos que Dios nos ha concedido a través de ellos”. – Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Por Lynette WilsonPosted Nov 2, 2012 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Servicelast_img read more